Joshua Polacheck, the Executive Director of the Pima County Democratic Party, surveyed the near-total sweep by Democratic Candidates to Pima County elected offices. He spoke at the November 9, 2020 meeting of the Democrats of Greater Tucson:

Highlights:

  • A remarkable 80% of Democrats in Pima County turned out to vote. In some precincts, the Democratic turnout was 95%.
  • Voters elected the most diverse group of candidates in Pima County history to fill countywide offices — exemplified top vote-getter Gabriella Casares-Kelly for County Recorder, who won with 56% of voter turnout. She follows retiring Recorder F. Ann Rodriguez, who was the first Latino female elected to Pima Countywide office.
  • Catherine Ripley, who is a Democrat, won her seat on the Pima County Community College governing board by an impressive 18,000 votes. It was a non-partisan election where many Republicans crossed over and voted for Ripley. She preplaces right-wing incumbent Ethan Orr, who wanted to privatize the public school.
  • Democrats coordinated well with activist groups including organized Labor and the Arizona Ground Game, which targeted LD11 with their “Project 11,” getting the vote out for Democrats JoAnna Mendoza and Felipe Perez. Democrats also benefited from strong support from Indivisible Arizona, Swing Left, Mi Familia Vota, Chispa AZ, and Lucha.
  • Democrats ran candidates in every office. Steve Diamond, the Democratic candidate for County Board of Supervisors in rock-ribbed republican District 4, was the first Democrat to run in the district in 24 years. He garnered 44% of the vote, with 57,031 votes. His candidacy motivated 5,000 to 10,000 Democrats to come to the polls and was supported by labor voters. He will be a force to deal with in future elections.
  • The Pima County Democratic Party emphatically supported the youth vote, by donating $10,000 to the Pima Young Democrats and UofA Young Democrats. Also, the county party devoted $12,000 to employ a dozen young people from under-invested communities as election workers. They were paid a living wage of $15 per hour.